Life in Water Blog

EcoAnalysts Travels to Poland

EcoAnalysts’ marine taxonomist Dr. David Drumm was invited to a workshop in Poland on the diversity of deep-sea tanaidacean crustaceans (May 16-22, 2017), led by Polish researcher Magdalena Błażewicz. Material from the IceAGE cruises (Iceland) was examined and several species new to science were discovered. David is collaborating with a Polish researcher on the description … Continue reading EcoAnalysts Travels to Poland

EcoAnalysts Travels to Poland

EcoAnalysts’ marine taxonomist Dr. David Drumm was invited to a workshop in Poland on the diversity of deep-sea tanaidacean crustaceans (May 16-22, 2017), led by Polish researcher Magdalena Błażewicz. Material from the IceAGE cruises (Iceland) was examined and several species new to science were discovered. David is collaborating with a Polish researcher on the description … Continue reading EcoAnalysts Travels to Poland

PRESS RELEASE: Port Gamble Lab

PDF of Press Release Aquatic Ecotoxicology Laboratory & Environmental Consulting Group Joins EcoAnalysts We are pleased to announce that effective January 1, 2017 an aquatic ecotoxicology laboratory and staff in Port Gamble, Washington has joined EcoAnalysts, Inc. (Moscow, Idaho). The scientists were formerly part of Ramboll Environ (Arlington, Virginia). This partnership augments EcoAnalysts’ capabilities, and … Continue reading PRESS RELEASE: Port Gamble Lab

Ecological Specialists, Inc. (ESI, O’Fallon, MO) and EcoAnalysts, Inc. (Moscow, ID) are merging

We are pleased to announce that Ecological Specialists, Inc. (ESI, O’Fallon, MO) and EcoAnalysts, Inc. (Moscow, ID) are merging. ESI has been owned and operated by Heidi Dunn since 1990, and has focused largely on freshwater mussel surveys and ecology, environmental impact assessment, endangered species consultation, fisheries surveys, and training for clients. ESI’s project locations … Continue reading Ecological Specialists, Inc. (ESI, O’Fallon, MO) and EcoAnalysts, Inc. (Moscow, ID) are merging

EcoAnalysts Exhibits at 2016 Alaska Marine Sciences Symposium

Our CEO, Gary Lester, is in Anchorage this week attending the 2016 AMSS (http://amss.nprb.org/). In 2015 the conference hosted 841 registrants, 189 universities and agencies, 26 different U.S. states, 9 Alaska Native tribal regions, 5 Canadian Provinces/Territories, and 3 countries. EcoAnalysts has processed  over 100 marine benthic infauna samples in the Bering Sea and Chuckchi Sea recently … Continue reading EcoAnalysts Exhibits at 2016 Alaska Marine Sciences Symposium

EcoAnalysts’ Taxonomists Attended the Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology

EcoAnalysts’ marine taxonomists David Drumm and Chip Barrett attended the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in Portland, Oregon, 3-7 January 2016. David Drumm presented a poster entitled, “New Deep-Sea Paratanaoidea (Crustacea: Peracarida: Tanaidacea) from the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico,” and Chip Barrett presented a poster entitled, “A new genus and … Continue reading EcoAnalysts’ Taxonomists Attended the Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology

Wetland destruction and increasing commercial development

Wetlands are geographical areas always covered by water at varying depths at different times throughout the year. The amount of water present in these environments controls the type of flora and fauna living in and on the soil. Wetlands support both aquatic and terrestrial organisms but favor the growth of organisms that are specifically adapted … Continue reading Wetland destruction and increasing commercial development

Evolving phytoplankton can tolerate warming waters

Carbon dioxide is a colorless gas that exists in a concentrated form in the atmosphere (330 ppm) and is released into the environment in very high quantities when burned. The current amount of carbon out of fossil fuels is 600 times greater than that into fossil fuels. With the mounting concerns over global warming and … Continue reading Evolving phytoplankton can tolerate warming waters