Category Archives: Bioassessment and Bioindicators of water quality

Toxic algae in Toledo’s drinking water becomes dangerous

Lake Erie's water intake crib, known historically as the "Fortress in the Lake," was an engineering feat first recognized in 1941, according to the Toledo Blade. The project cost the city only $9.88 million and took four years to build. The crib intake system was originally designed to work for 60 years. However, it is … Continue reading Toxic algae in Toledo’s drinking water becomes dangerous

California’s drought, El Niño and aquatic ecology

For the last four years, California has experienced one of the most severe droughts ever recorded. California Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency in January to prepare for the statewide water shortages and put firm conservation procedures into effect. According to a study published in the British journal Nature Climate Change, the snowpack in the … Continue reading California’s drought, El Niño and aquatic ecology

Warming temperatures are causing Arctic mosquito populations to thrive

Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, has conducted a study found in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences that concluded warming temperatures in the Arctic are causing species of mosquitoes to grow faster and emerge earlier in the year. This is significantly increasing their populations and threatening many of the different … Continue reading Warming temperatures are causing Arctic mosquito populations to thrive

Dangerous toxic algae bloom growing near the California coast

The largest algae bloom currently on record is growing off of the coast of California. It stretches from Alaska down to central California and measures approximately 40 miles wide, and in some areas, up to 650 feet deep. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this bloom has significantly diminished the populations of … Continue reading Dangerous toxic algae bloom growing near the California coast